MAKE UP SCHOOL IN NEW YORK - MAKE UP SCHOOL


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Make Up School In New York





make up school in new york






    new york
  • the largest city in New York State and in the United States; located in southeastern New York at the mouth of the Hudson river; a major financial and cultural center

  • a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies

  • one of the British colonies that formed the United States

  • A state in the northeastern US, on the Canadian border and Lake Ontario in the northwest, as well as on the Atlantic coast in the southeast; pop. 18,976,457; capital, Albany; statehood, July 26, 1788 (11). Originally settled by the Dutch, it was surrendered to the British in 1664. New York was one of the original thirteen states

  • A major city and port in southeastern New York, situated on the Atlantic coast at the mouth of the Hudson River; pop. 7,322,564. It is situated mainly on islands, linked by bridges, and consists of five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island. Manhattan is the economic and cultural heart of the city, containing the stock exchange on Wall Street and the headquarters of the United Nations





    make up
  • Cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance

  • makeup: an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"

  • The composition or constitution of something

  • The combination of qualities that form a person's temperament

  • constitute: form or compose; "This money is my only income"; "The stone wall was the backdrop for the performance"; "These constitute my entire belonging"; "The children made up the chorus"; "This sum represents my entire income for a year"; "These few men comprise his entire army"

  • constitution: the way in which someone or something is composed





    school
  • A large group of fish or sea mammals

  • educate in or as if in a school; "The children are schooled at great cost to their parents in private institutions"

  • a building where young people receive education; "the school was built in 1932"; "he walked to school every morning"

  • an educational institution; "the school was founded in 1900"











make up school in new york - The Kings




The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top HighSchool Chess Team


The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top HighSchool Chess Team



An award-winning sportswriter takes you inside a year with the nation’s top high school chess team.
With strict admission standards and a progressive curriculum, Brooklyn’s Edward R. Murrow High School has long been one of New York’s public-education success stories, serving a diverse neighborhood of immigrants and minorities and ranking among the nation’s best high schools. At Murrow, there are no sports teams, and the closest thing to jocks are found on the school’s powerhouse chess team, which annually competes for the national championship.
In The Kings of New York sportswriter Michael Weinreb follows the members of the Murrow chess team through an entire season, from cash games in Washington Square Park to city and state tournaments to the SuperNationals in Nashville, where this eclectic bunch competes against private schoolers and suburbanites. Along the way, Weinreb brings to life a number of colorful characters: the Yale-educated calculus teacher (and former semipro hockey player) who guides the savants while struggling to find funding for his team; an aspiring rapper and tournament hustler who plays with cutthroat instinct; the team’s lone girl, a shy Ukrainian immigrant; the Puerto Rican teen from the rough neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant who plays an ingenious opening gambit named the Orangutan; and the Lithuanian immigrant and team star whose chess rating is climbing toward grandmaster status.
In the bestselling tradition of such books as Word Freak and Friday Night Lights, The Kings of New York is a riveting look inside the world of competitive chess and an inspiring profile of young genius.

An award-winning sportswriter takes you inside a year with the nation’s top high school chess team.
With strict admission standards and a progressive curriculum, Brooklyn’s Edward R. Murrow High School has long been one of New York’s public-education success stories, serving a diverse neighborhood of immigrants and minorities and ranking among the nation’s best high schools. At Murrow, there are no sports teams, and the closest thing to jocks are found on the school’s powerhouse chess team, which annually competes for the national championship.
In The Kings of New York sportswriter Michael Weinreb follows the members of the Murrow chess team through an entire season, from cash games in Washington Square Park to city and state tournaments to the SuperNationals in Nashville, where this eclectic bunch competes against private schoolers and suburbanites. Along the way, Weinreb brings to life a number of colorful characters: the Yale-educated calculus teacher (and former semipro hockey player) who guides the savants while struggling to find funding for his team; an aspiring rapper and tournament hustler who plays with cutthroat instinct; the team’s lone girl, a shy Ukrainian immigrant; the Puerto Rican teen from the rough neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant who plays an ingenious opening gambit named the Orangutan; and the Lithuanian immigrant and team star whose chess rating is climbing toward grandmaster status.
In the bestselling tradition of such books as Word Freak and Friday Night Lights, The Kings of New York is a riveting look inside the world of competitive chess and an inspiring profile of young genius.










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New York Public Library, Morrisania Branch




New York Public Library, Morrisania Branch





Morrisania, Bronx

Opened on December 1, 1908, this is the fourth branch library in the Bronx and the twenty eighth in the city to have been built with funds provided by the multi-million dollar gifts made m 1901-02 by Andrew Carnegie for the purpose of establishing a city-wide system of sixty-five neighborhood libraries.

The McKinley Square Branch of the New York Public Library was designed by the prominent architectural firm of Babb, Cook & Willard, which had designed Carnegie's own house on East 91st Street in 1899-1903. The plan of the branch contrasts with those of the Carnegie-endowed libraries built on narrow lots. It is a freestanding two-story building with a T-shaped plan with lower two-story wings facing East 169th Street.

Classical Revival in style, it has a centrally-placed entrance through a projecting stone portico with arched window openings lighting the interior. The branch was actively sought by residents of the area after the Carnegie gift was announced; over 1,500 signed petitions.

The branch was extensively rehabilitated and made handicapped-accessible beginning in 1995. For ninety years, the branch, now called the Morrisania Library has been visually and historically an important component of its community.

History of Morrisania

The Morrisania section of the Bronx was named after the prominent Morris family, local landowners and politicians through several generations from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. Morrisania became one of the twenty-one townships of Westchester County in 1788, and was annexed to the Town of Westchester in 1791.

The construction of the Harlem and Hudson River Railroads, beginning in 1842, resulted in the start of development and an increase in population, particularly an influx of German and Irish immigrants. Morrisania became part of the new township of West Farms in 1846, was the most populous section of Westchester County by 1855, and was chartered as a separate town in 1864.

When Morrisania was formally annexed to New York City in 1874, along with the western section of the Bronx, it had a population of over 19,000. By the late nineteenth century, Morrisania had a predominantly German population, with its own local brewing industry. Expansion of the elevated railroad lines along Third Avenue beginning in the mid-1880s, and later, the IRT subway system, reaching the area in 1904, helped spur a vast real estate boom.

Between 1874 and 1911, the population of the annexed section of the Bronx grew by 1,300 percent, the majority of which occurred after the annexation of the rest of the Bronx in 1895. At that time, the Bronx would have been the seventh largest city in the United States. Starting in the 1930s, the ethnic composition of the area's population changed as earlier groups moved and new immigrant families came to the neighborhood.

The part of the neighborhood in which the library is located was known in the mid-nineteenth century as Eltona after Robert H. Elton, who had purchased property from Gouveraeur Morris, built his home near Boston Road and 166th Street, and began to subdivide the land in the 1850s.

Thomas Rogers, a prominent Wall Street financier, built a home on part of this land around 1872; the Rogers estate was divided for sale around 1900, the largest portion going to the City for the borough's first high school, Morris High School (1901-04, C.B.J. Snyder). The remaining portion of the estate was developed with rowhouses in 1900-06; these buildings make up the Morris High School Historic District, located two blocks to the southeast of the library.

McKinley Square, which was officially named in 1902 in honor of the recently-deceased United States president, became the major traffic hub and commercial center of Morrisania. Beatty Plaza, one block to the west of McKinley Square, was named in 1940 in honor of local World War I hero. Sergeant Arthur G. Beatty. The decision to locate a branch of the New York Public Library in Morrisania represents the growth of that neighborhood at the turn of the century and the accompanying expansion of public services.

History of Bronx Libraries

Prior to the receipt of Andrew Carnegie's grant and the ensuing library building campaign which produced nine branches of the New York Public Library in the borough, the Bronx had only a handful of circulating libraries which were either private, church-related, or school district-affiliated. One of the earliest was the Van Schaick Free Reading Room, a designated New York City Landmark at Westchester Square, which was donated to the community by local philanthropist Peter C. Van Schaick in 1882-83 and designed by Frederick Clarke Withers.

The library was expanded to the designs of William Anderson in 1890, when it was endowed by railroad tycoon and Throggs Neck resident Collis P. Huntington, and renamed. The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is still administered by its trustees and functions as a non-circulating library ope











New York Times: Coming Home




New York Times: Coming Home





Photo: Fred R. Conrad
By MICHAEL WEINREB
Published: May 20, 2007

PATRICK O’NEIL, tall and broad-shouldered, towers over many of his classmates at the New York City College of Technology in Downtown Brooklyn, and at age 31 he is older than many of them. But there is also a less apparent gulf between Mr. O’Neil and his fellow students.

“I watch these people moving through their lives, and it’s so odd,” he said one afternoon a few weeks ago in a vaguely industrial-looking lounge in Namm Hall as other students studied, stared vacantly out the windows or rushed past on their way elsewhere. “After I got back, I had an epiphany: If you think the next week you could go on a convoy and get blown to bits, the ‘right now’ is more valuable. I realized there were no guarantees.”

Mr. O’Neil is a veteran. He is one of about 200 former servicemen and servicewomen who are enrolled this semester at City Tech, a college with more than 28,000 students that is housed largely in a labyrinth of interconnected buildings amid the courthouses and office buildings of Downtown Brooklyn.

The contingent of veterans at City Tech is not small, and it is likely to grow, as is the veterans’ presence at the 22 other institutions of the sprawling City University system. As war in the Middle East continues and American troops rotate into and out of Iraq and Afghanistan, greater numbers of veterans are returning to the city. CUNY’s affordability — tuition is $4,000 a year at City Tech, for example — appeals to many of them.

Perhaps most important, CUNY officials, who oversee about 450,000 students, are actively seeking to make their schools more attractive to former soldiers. Among other things, they are appointing a specialist in veterans’ issues on every campus, setting up a Web site on veterans’ affairs, lobbying the State Legislature for more money for veterans’ services, and allowing veterans to take classes before they receive their federal tuition money.

The bottom line is that the CUNY system, which now has about 2,500 veterans enrolled, hopes to have many more. “We’re expecting an influx of new veterans in the next two years,” said Garrie Moore, the CUNY vice chancellor for student development. “We know the need is there.”

For people like Mr. O’Neil, going back to school after military service offers many of the hallmarks of college, from its intellectual demands to its social opportunities to the career aspirations it nurtures. But in many respects, the veterans are not typical students. They are set apart not just by age and experience, but also by the challenge of re-entering civilian society and by the fact that they stand in the crosshairs of the widespread antipathy toward the Iraq war, a dislike that is especially strong in a liberal city like New York.

“I’m starting to realize more and more how odd it is to adjust,” said Mr. O’Neil, who dresses like other students but whose dark hair is shorter than most. “There are a lot of subtle things in your life that shift.”
Does he feel like an outsider? “I guess you could say that,” he replied.

Uneasy Naps
In the traditionally liberal climate of a college campus, Philip Chiu, a soft-spoken former infantryman who is in his third semester at City Tech, is taking a bit of a risk in saying that he liked being in Iraq.

Mr. Chiu, a slight and introspective man who loves photography, also knows that it is difficult to explain this feeling to those who have not experienced what he did, who cannot comprehend how the rush of adrenaline somehow serves to remind a human being that he is alive.
But fellow veterans understand. “Strangely,” said Mr. O’Neil, “I can see what he’s saying.”

The craving for adrenaline is not the only distinction between veterans and other collegians. So is a very different desire — sleep. It is not that veterans don’t enjoy the collegiate habit of sleeping in; Mr. Chiu sleeps in whenever he gets a chance. But he does so almost to make up for all those years when uninterrupted rest was at a premium. And even as he slumbers like countless other college students, he says, he feels strange, as if the world around him had shifted into a slower gear.
“I can do whatever I want, and no one will bother me,” Mr. Chiu said. “College has been easy so far. But I still miss the military.”

In countless ways, the return to civilian life can be hard. “I think things were not as difficult for Vietnam veterans as they are today,” said Dr. Moore, the CUNY vice chancellor, himself a Vietnam veteran. “Vets now have a lot of pressures on them. Things are more expensive. They’ve got to find health care. They’ve got to find child care. A major difficulty is access to information and access to resources to help them get into educational institutions.”

The veterans’ go-to person at City Tech is John Byrnes, an Iraq veteran and a graduate of CUNY’s Hunter College. He works with a full-time student counselor, Paul Schwartz, and an assistant registrar, Monique Blake, who estimates t









make up school in new york








make up school in new york




Your Birthday Book: A Keepsake Journal






Start this at birth, wrap it up at eighteen, fill it out each year in between.

This is not anything like a baby book. It’s a birthday book! It was born from the simple idea that birthdays provide the perfect annual opportunity to preserve a sweet moment in time as your child changes from year to year. So it’s a multi-layered confection: annual touchstone, cherished ritual, and eternal keepsake. This journal provides fun, fast, and casual birthday activities for ages 1-18 as well as space to stick birthday photos and a random picture from each year, amusing and thought-provoking questions to ask your kid, and a time-capsule envelope for stashing away odds and ends (artwork, school papers, hand tracings, birthday cards, invitations, and other memorabilia).

From toddler hood to young adulthood to every hood in between, you’ll return to the same four activities for each birthday. The questions prompts, and tone may shift each year, but the essence intentionally remains intact.










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